1- ONE MONTH / ONE PERSONAL NAME: each month, a study of one personal name, all over the world 

 

ONE MONTH, ONE NAME, October 2019 :

1-1- Clarage – Claridge

A study of some British family names, published  by Philippe POTEL-BELNER, in his monthly page,  on the site langue-et-histoire.com, on the 17th of September 2019.

 

 

In  "a Dictionary of British Surnames",  this current British name  is stated as coming from the medieval  names:  Robert de Claurugge, 1327, in Sussex and  John Claridge, 1665, in Oxfordshire.

This book  links these medieval  names  to  a place name: Clearhedge Wood  in Sussex (Clavregge  in 1288, also spelt Claregge in 1429).

 

In my opinion, two elements are recognizable in these current or medieval names: 

1- a very old first name (individual name),  Clar / Clair / etc...

2- an anthroponymic  suffix  -rage / -ridge, which signifies, in the Vedic former language:  what assembles  upward  or  toward or in the future.  That is to say:  some one who continues  Clar 's  line of descendants.

I  use a French verb  ASSEMBLER, because I am able to understand its accurate meaning in french  which is:  to link two  or more parts, like, for example,  to connect  two parts of a road  by a bridge.

In this meaning,  there is an idea of movement, but  the verb ASSEMBLER can also get an idea of immobility. The sanskrit verb  Ŗ  also means  « to be successful ».

 

The suffixes   -rage  / -ridge  are composed of the Vedic phonem of the Assemblage  /Ṛ/  and  a morphem  expressing  a movement  toward / upward / in the future:   udya  / idja  = what goes  (ya)  upward  (ud / out / id / etc...).  One can recognize this morphem in english:  a ridge = a summit;  to rage =  to arouse, etc...

 

 

ANTIQUITY

Celts:  Clar-i, Clar, Clar-os.

Romans:  Clar-us,

ethnonyms:  Clariae  (in Thrace)

place names:  Claros

latin:  clerus = clergy

 

MIDDLE  AGES

FranceClar-us  / Cler-us  (VI to XIIth  century), Clar-boldus  / Clarabaldus (X and XIth century), etc...

There are many  saints or bishops  who  were named  Clair  (Clear, Cleer, in GB).

 

Nowadays:

place names:  Glarus (Switzerland)

French  family names:  Clerc, Leclerc  (< *alla Clerc =  who makes  to go forward  Cler)  , Clergue,  Saint-Clair  (who makes  to go forward Clair), etc..

FR/english = clair / clear, that is opposite to black: white or a luminous  color.

 

 

 

 

bibliographie:

langue-et-histoire, volume 15,  2018.

DBS = a Dictionary of British surnames, 1958 and after...